Last edited by Grorn
Thursday, October 22, 2020 | History

4 edition of The Mennonite immigration to Pennsylvania in the eighteenth century found in the catalog.

The Mennonite immigration to Pennsylvania in the eighteenth century

The Mennonite immigration to Pennsylvania in the eighteenth century

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Published by [Norristown Press] in Norristown, Pa .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Mennonites -- Pennsylvania

  • Edition Notes

    StatementC. Henry Smith.
    SeriesPennslvania : the German influences in its settlement and development -- pt. 33, Library of American civilization -- LAC 13914., Pennsylvania : the German influence in its settlement and development -- pt. 33.
    The Physical Object
    FormatMicroform
    Pagination412 p.
    Number of Pages412
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL13559370M
    OCLC/WorldCa17826667

    Early Eighteenth Century Palatine Emigration Losch, and Zerbe families are in this script book. New York Historical Society Library contains a manuscript of an Indian Treaty with regard to Schoharie, New York and the Palatines. "The Mennonite Immigration to Pennsylvania in the 18th Century," in Pennsylvania=German Society Proceedings. The early nineteenth century was a time of relative harmony, with the population of the settlement growing through immigration from southeastern Pennsylvania. By the s the Big Valley congregation had grown so large that it had to be divided into three districts. The variety of Amish and Mennonite groups in Big Valley is an interesting.

    Given their "underground" status, it is difficult to find recorded evidence of the Mennonites in seventeenth- and eighteenth-century German and Swiss records. Indeed, tracing Mennonite and other Anabaptist immigrants from Pennsylvania back to their place of origin ranks as one of the most challenging tasks facing a German-American genealogist. !EMIGRATION: C. Henry Smith, THE MENNONITE IMMIGRATION TO PENNSYLVANIA IN THE EIGHTEENTH CENTURY; ; Pennsylvania, Norristown Press, (printed in the Pennsylvania German Society, ); pp ; LDS FHL SCL [, B4pg, V].

    Databases: Two significant databases that focus on southeastern Pennsylvania and Mennonite genealogy are available through the Online Resources. The Russian-Mennonite GRANDMA database is available on the public computers. Deeds: A book of published deed abstracts for Lancaster County from to about is shelved in the reference area.   By , usage of Pennsylvania Dutch, a primarily oral language with roots in 18th-century German immigration to North America, reached its zenith. Perhaps as many as , Americans and eastern Canadians spoke it. Astonishingly, at that time, only about 5 percent of these individuals were Amish or Mennonite.


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The Mennonite immigration to Pennsylvania in the eighteenth century Download PDF EPUB FB2

The Mennonite immigration to Pennsylvania in the eighteenth century. [C Henry Smith; Pennsylvania-German Society.] Home. WorldCat Home About WorldCat Help. Search. Search for Library Items Search for Lists Search for # Mennonites--Pennsylvania--History\/span> \u00A0\u00A0\u00A0 schema.

The Mennonite Immigration To Pennsylvania In The Eighteenth Century Top results of your surfing The Mennonite Immigration To Pennsylvania In The Eighteenth Century Start Download Portable Document Format (PDF) and E-books (Electronic Books) Free Online Rating News / is books that can provide inspiration, insight, knowledge to the reader.

Get this from a library. The Mennonite immigration to Pennsylvania in the 18th century. [C Henry Smith]. 34 C. Henry Smith, The Mennonite Immigration to Pennsylvania in the Eighteenth Century, pp.

35 Crous, p. 36 C. Henry Smith, The Mennonite Immigration to Pennsylvania in the Eighteenth Century, pp. It is interesting to note that among those who came to Pennsylvania were Krehbiels, Millers, Zergers, and Schrags.

Open Library is an open, editable library catalog, building towards a web page for every book ever published. The Mennonite immigration to Pennsylvania in the eighteenth century by C.

Henry Smith,[Norristown Press] edition, Microform in English. Irish Quakers came to Pennsylvania as early as the 17th Century. An outstanding historical study with brief biographies and names of extended family members remaining in Ireland, and which provides a summary of Irish Quaker emigration and migration to the state, is: Immigration of Irish Quakers to Pennsylvania, Many Mennonites emigrated to North America in the late seventeenth century to escape religious persecution in Europe.

Attracted by William Penn’s promise of a “holy experiment” where believers of multiple religious backgrounds could live in peace, the first wave of Mennonite immigrants arrived in Pennsylvania by October A few Dutch Mennonites began the immigration to America infollowed by a larger immigration of Swiss-German Mennonites beginning in In the s Dutch Mennonites, who had settled in the German Kingdom of Prussia and then Russia, moved to the United States and Canada where they became known as Russian Mennonites.

German Immigration to Pennsylvania, to I The largest group of non-British Europeans arriving in North America during the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries were Germans. Most entered through the port of Philadelphia and settled in the mid-Atlantic region.

From toGer-man immigrants represented 20 to 30 percent of the population. Nineteenth-century German immigration to Pennsylvania never matched the levels from the pre-Revolutionary War era and generally declined after the Civil War.

Immigration from Germany rose briefly during the s when new immigration quotas favored old immigrants while severely restricting arrivals from southern and eastern Europe. By the American Revolution, there were at least eight Amish settlements in Pennsylvania and by the end of the eighteenth century the population had expanded into Somerset and Mifflin counties.

Inat the end of the Napoleonic Wars, the second wave of Amish immigration into the United States began. to present, pages. Pennsylvania Mennonite Heritage, the Society’s quarterly magazine, focuses on the historical background (Europe and America), religious thought and expression, culture, and family history of Mennonite and Amish-related groups originating in onal features: genealogical tips, readers’ ancestry, queries, Pennsylvania German dialect stories, and.

This DNA Project focuses specifically on Mennonite and Amish Immigrants to Pennsylvania and their families and descendants. This project originated in October as the "DNA Pilot Project" through the Lancaster Mennonite Historical Society, Lancaster, Pa., in reference to the three hundred year anniversary of the first Mennonite settlers to what is now Lancaster County, Pennsylvania.

Mennonite emigration to Pennsylvania: Friendly relations between the Mennonites in Holland and those in Pennsylvania [Hoop Scheffer, Jacob Gijsbert de] on *FREE* shipping on qualifying offers. Mennonite emigration to Pennsylvania: Friendly relations between the Mennonites in Holland and those in PennsylvaniaAuthor: Jacob Gijsbert de Hoop Scheffer.

The roots of the Pennsylvania Dutch language extend back to the migration to Pennsylvania of aro German speakers from central and southwestern Germany, Alsace, and Switzerland during the eighteenth century. 1 At that time, Germans and Swiss of all social classes spoke regional dialects that in most cases differed quite substantially from the emerging written dialect.

Genealogy Resources. Cemetery Database Surnames with material available. The Historical Library and Archives contain a rich collection of materials relating to three centuries of Mennonite and local history and culture in Montgomery, Bucks, Chester, Berks, Lehigh, Northampton and Philadelphia counties in eastern Pennsylvania.

The German Palatines were early 18th-century emigrants from the Middle Rhine region of the Holy Roman Empire, including a minority from the Palatinate which gave its name to the entire group.

They were both Protestant and Catholic. Towards the end of the 17th century and into the 18th, the wealthy region was repeatedly invaded by French troops, which resulted in continuous military. This banner text can have markup.

web; books; video; audio; software; images; Toggle navigation. The Pennsylvania Dutch maintained numerous religious affiliations, with the greatest number being Lutheran or German Reformed, but also with many Anabaptists, including Mennonites, Amish, and Anabaptist religions promoted a simple life-style, and their adherents were known as Plain people or Plain Dutch.

This was in contrast to the Fancy Dutch, who tended to assimilate more easily. Pennsylvania German, also called (misleadingly) Pennsylvania Dutch, 17th- and 18th-century German-speaking settlers in Pennsylvania and their descendants.

Emigrating from southern Germany (Palatinate, Bavaria, Saxony, etc.) and Switzerland, they settled primarily in the southeastern section of Pennsylvania, where they practiced any of several slightly different forms of Anabaptist faith.

Ontario's Mennonite Heritage (Published in SPARETIME magazine, Vol. 6, Issues 8, 9, 10, ) Mennonites in Pennsylvania The Early Years in Upper Canada Canadian Mennonites Fare Better than Russian Mennonites.

Part I, Mennonites in Pennsylvania. ByMennonites were old hands at pioneering in the New World.Index to persons in the Mennonite immigration to Pennsylvania in the eighteenth century, by C. Henry Smith Author: Johnson, Arta F. Published "[Pennsylvania Dutch] is written in a very accessible style and provides good information about the Pennsylvania Dutch language." (Canadian Mennonite)"Louden captures the spirit of the folk-cultural narrative and remains engaging, accessible, and entertaining to a wide range of audiences."Cited by: 3.